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Goat's Beard (Aruncus dioicus)

Goat's Beard (Aruncus dioicus)

Best grown in moist, fertile, organically rich soils in full sun to part shade. Foliage decline can occur rapidly if soils are permitted to dry out. With consistent moisture, it performs well in full sun in the northern portions of its growing range. It prefers part shade in the southern part of its growing range. Removing faded flower stalks will not prolong bloom, but may improve plant appearance, particularly if a ground cover look is desired. On the other hand, flower stalks on female plants may be left in place to enjoy the continuing ornamental effect of the dried seed plumes. Plants can be slow to establish. Plants may struggle in the hot and humid conditions of the deep South and are not recommended for gardens south of USDA Zone 7.

 

Aruncus dioicus, commonly called goat's beard, is a Missouri native plant which occurs in moist woodlands and along bluffs in the central and southeast part of the State. A tall, erect, bushy, clump-forming plant typically growing 4-6' high which features pinnately compound, dark green foliage and showy, plume-like spikes of tiny, cream colored flowers which rise well above the foliage in early to mid summer, creating a bold effect. This rose family member is somewhat similar in appearance to astilbe. Dioecious (separate male and female plants) as the species name suggests. Plants with male flowers (numerous stamens per flower) produce a showier bloom than plants with female flowers (three pistils per flower).

Native Range: Temperate northern hemisphere

Zone: 4 to 8

Height: 4.00 to 6.00 feet

Spread: 2.00 to 4.00 feet

Bloom Time: April to May

Bloom Description: Cream

Sun: Full sun to part shade

Water: Medium to wet

Maintenance: Low

Suggested Use: Rain Garden

Flower: Showy

Tolerate: Rabbit

$6.00Price

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